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Old 06-01-2010, 08:29 AM
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GregGleason GregGleason is offline
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Default Wood Filler Question - Small Holes

I need a recommended wood filler for the following situation:

I have a nose cone plug that was made of poplar (kiln dried). It was machined about six months ago and now there are little pin holes in the wood. It looks like there were some creatures in there that wanted to bore their way out. The holes (about half a dozen or so) are very tiny (about 0.5 to 1.0 mm), but they do affect the surface. I know it was an "inside job" because the wood has been in saran wrap almost the entire time.

Since I am going to use it as a plug for a mold, I need to seal and wax it. Before I can do those tasks, I need to fill these holes and sand then to shape.

Can someone suggest a product that is suited for the task?

Greg

Last edited by GregGleason : 06-01-2010 at 08:57 AM.
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Old 06-01-2010, 08:51 AM
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ghrocketman ghrocketman is offline
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I would use a product called "Plastic Wood".
It is actual cellulose (powdered wood) fibers dissolved in an organic solvent.
Lots of folks on here will probably reccommend the water based "Elmers fill n' finish" which is far INFERIOR to plastic wood as an actual filler material.
Plastic Wood is actually HARD when it dries, whereas the elmers product is actually very soft.
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Old 06-01-2010, 10:28 PM
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Mark II Mark II is offline
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I like to use water-thinned Elmer's Wood Filler (a k a Fill 'N Finish) to fill spirals and other patch jobs on tubes, but I don't care for using it on wood, especially nose cones. So I basically agree with gh. Minwax also makes a product that looks similar to Plastic Wood, but I haven't tried it. Elmer's makes other wood filler products that are packaged in squeeze tubes. These do not seem to be the same thing as FNF. (I cannot imagine what it would take to squeeze FNF out of a plastic tube. The stuff in the tub has the consistency of a damp block of chalk.) Elmer's makes a variety of wood fillers; some are very tough after they cure. That may be more than what you need, though. A rock-hard filler may not be necessary for an object that will subsequently be coated with polyurethane or Polycrylic and then used as a mold master.

MK
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Old 06-02-2010, 05:01 AM
stantonjtroy stantonjtroy is offline
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If you're going to use it for a mold plug, why not just use Bondo? You Could even melt some wax into the holes. It only has to stand up for the mold, not paint or flight.
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Old 06-02-2010, 06:50 AM
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GregGleason GregGleason is offline
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I took GH's advice and got "Plastic Wood". My "gut instinct" was telling me to stay away from anything water-based, since it typically makes wood swell, and not in a good way.

I'll let everyone know how it works out. I've never done this before so I'm sure I'll have more surprises ahead.



Greg
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Old 06-02-2010, 08:17 AM
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rokitflite rokitflite is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GregGleason
My "gut instinct" was telling me to stay away from anything water-based, since it typically makes wood swell, and not in a good way.

Greg


You are just sooo wrong Greg...
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